How to Remove Paint from Hardware

Ah friends, blogging is much harder than I thought it would be. I apologize for not being more consistent with my posts. I have to admit, I’ve found that Instagram is a much easier form of social media for me to keep up with. Perhaps partly because I don’t have to take pictures on one device and then move to a different device to share it. Anyway, if you’d like to keep more “up-to-date” with my days, you can find me here. There’s also something special in the works that’s kept me busy, and I’ll share that with you all soon, promise (If you already follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you probably already know what that is).

Anyway, I do have a fun project to share with you all today. Recently, my mother-in-love shared with me a huge box of hardware from their recent renovation. This is coveted vintage hardware, folks. And it is beautiful. The downside was that over the years, some of the pieces had been painted on. So, after a little research (since I don’t have paint remover), I figured out how to bring them back to life.

This is what the hook I cleaned looked like before I started:

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Talk about caked in paint!

Here’s what you’ll need:

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  • Paint-crusted hardware
  • Nail polish remover
  • A plate or some surface to protect your table
  • A putty knife for extra stubborn paint (I used a table knife)
  • A Q-tip
  • Cotton wads

You’re first step is to setup. Be sure to have a surface that can handle the nail polish; that stuff can eat through a lot of things (made me wonder how in the world it’s safe for our skin; guess our skin is really resilient?).

Next, dip your Q-tip into the nail polish remover, and test it on the hardware surface on an inconspicuous spot. If your fixture is a solid metal (like mine was), you won’t see any of the color come off when you do this; if you see any color come off, then you won’t be able to safely use the nail polish remover to remove the paint.

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Once you’ve confirmed that the nail polish is safe to use on your hardware, go for it! Seep the remover into your cotton wads and go at that paint. Depending on how much paint is on there, this could be a fast or a slow process. Mine had quite a bit caked on, so I probably spent a good half hour on it (hence the reason I only got through one). As I mentioned earlier, having a putty knife handy is helpful; for sections that are particularly thick, I softened the paint with the remover, then scraped it off with the knife.

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And that’s it! Be sure to wash the hardware once you’re done; you don’t need any residual nail polish remover getting on your clothes.

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Doesn’t it look so good?

Go ahead! Go put it up, and enjoy the fruit of your labor.

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