How to Remove Paint from Hardware

Ah friends, blogging is much harder than I thought it would be. I apologize for not being more consistent with my posts. I have to admit, I’ve found that Instagram is a much easier form of social media for me to keep up with. Perhaps partly because I don’t have to take pictures on one device and then move to a different device to share it. Anyway, if you’d like to keep more “up-to-date” with my days, you can find me here. There’s also something special in the works that’s kept me busy, and I’ll share that with you all soon, promise (If you already follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you probably already know what that is).

Anyway, I do have a fun project to share with you all today. Recently, my mother-in-love shared with me a huge box of hardware from their recent renovation. This is coveted vintage hardware, folks. And it is beautiful. The downside was that over the years, some of the pieces had been painted on. So, after a little research (since I don’t have paint remover), I figured out how to bring them back to life.

This is what the hook I cleaned looked like before I started:

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Talk about caked in paint!

Here’s what you’ll need:

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  • Paint-crusted hardware
  • Nail polish remover
  • A plate or some surface to protect your table
  • A putty knife for extra stubborn paint (I used a table knife)
  • A Q-tip
  • Cotton wads

You’re first step is to setup. Be sure to have a surface that can handle the nail polish; that stuff can eat through a lot of things (made me wonder how in the world it’s safe for our skin; guess our skin is really resilient?).

Next, dip your Q-tip into the nail polish remover, and test it on the hardware surface on an inconspicuous spot. If your fixture is a solid metal (like mine was), you won’t see any of the color come off when you do this; if you see any color come off, then you won’t be able to safely use the nail polish remover┬áto remove the paint.

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Once you’ve confirmed that the nail polish is safe to use on your hardware, go for it! Seep the remover into your cotton wads and go at that paint. Depending on how much paint is on there, this could be a fast or a slow process. Mine had quite a bit caked on, so I probably spent a good half hour on it (hence the reason I only got through one). As I mentioned earlier, having a putty knife handy is helpful; for sections that are particularly thick, I softened the paint with the remover, then scraped it off with the knife.

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And that’s it! Be sure to wash the hardware once you’re done; you don’t need any residual nail polish remover getting on your clothes.

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Doesn’t it look so good?

Go ahead! Go put it up, and enjoy the fruit of your labor.

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How to Update a Jar

Hi friends! Isn’t this weather glorious?? I’ve been waiting for just such a lovely, sunny day for this project, and I’m so excited to share it with you.

I shared with you a while back about the beautiful glass jars that I have in my pantry. They were given to me by my mother-in-law, who had collected them over many years for use in her own pantry. But in their recent kitchen update, they decided to switch to different containers that fit their new setup better, and she asked if I would like to have them. Would I ever!! There was no hesitation in my answer: yes.

I’ve loved using them ever since, but had always wanted to paint the lids so that they were all the same color. Also, the advertisement for pickles was kind of getting old. And so, I recently purchased a can of gold spray paint, and today was the day I stepped out and did some spraying.

Here’s what you’ll need for this project:

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  • Jar lids
  • A can of spray paint
  • Newspaper
  • A sunny day (or a well ventilated room, such as your garage with the door open)

Your first step is to make sure that those lids are clean. Mine were in pretty decent shape, as I had washed them all recently, so I didn’t clean them again, but if they do have any dust on them, go ahead and suds up and get them clean.

Next, spread out the newspaper.

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Lay out the lids on top of the newspaper, and spray away!

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Now, I found out that these lids needed a lot more paint to totally cover them than I thought, so I actually ran out of spray paint, so make sure to get a large can if you have a lot of lids to paint.

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Next, let them soak up some sun for at least 30 minutes (check the label on your can; some spray paints may require more time to dry).

And you’re done!

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I’m so happy with how these turned out!

While I’m on the subject of the pantry, I’ve been wanting to change the liner that is currently in there, and I wanted to share a sneak peak of the options I’m looking at, and I would LOVE your feedback:

Option 1:

Isn’t this so bright and fun? And apparently it’s scented too; not quite sure how I feel about that, but it sounds somewhat attractive. (Here‘s the Amazon link for it)

Option 2:

Michel Design Works Scented Drawer Liners, Blue

I recently decided to change my kitchen colors to blue, white and gray, so this is an option that would match the kitchen. (Here‘s the Amazon link for it)

What do you guys think? Should I go with the bolder pink one? Or stick with the kitchen color scheme?

If any of you have a shelf liner that you love, and would be willing to share it with me, I’d love to see it! Feel free to leave a comment with a picture of what it looks like and where you got it.